John Lennon
A bearded, bespectacled man in his late twenties, with long black hair and wearing a loose-fitting white shirt, sings and plays an acoustic guitar. White flowers are visible behind and to the right of him.

Lennon rehearsing “Give Peace a Chance” in Montreal, Canada in 1969.
Background information
Birth name John Winston Lennon
Born 9 October 1940(1940-10-09)
Liverpool, England
Died 8 December 1980 (aged 40)
New York City, New York
Genres Rock, pop rock, psychedelic rock, experimental rock, rock and roll
Occupations Musician, singer–songwriter, artist, peace activist, writer, record producer
Instruments Vocals, guitar, piano, bass, harmonica
Years active 1957–1975, 1980
Labels Parlophone, Capitol, Apple, EMI, Geffen, Polydor
Associated acts The Quarrymen, The Beatles, Plastic Ono Band, The Dirty Mac, Yoko Ono
Website www.johnlennon.com
 

Jared Padalecki

Padalecki at the 2008 Comic-Con.
Born Jared Tristan Padalecki
July 19, 1982 (1982-07-19) (age 27)
San Antonio, Texas,
United States
Occupation Actor
Years active 1999—present

 

Ian Somerhalder More at IMDbPro »

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Date of Birth

8 December 1978, Covington, Louisiana, USA

Birth Name

Ian Joseph Somerhalder

Height

5′ 9½” (1.77 m)

Mini Biography

The son of a massage therapist and a building contractor, Somerhalder was born and raised in the small southern town of Covington, LA. Boating, swimming, fishing and training horses filled much of his recreational time growing up, as did the school drama club and performing with the local theater group. With his mother’s encouragement, at age 10 he began a modeling career that took him to New York each summer. By junior high, he opted to put modeling on the back burner and focus more on sports and school. A few years later, when the opportunity to model in Europe arose, Somerhalder grabbed it, embarking on an enriching path of work, travel and study that took him to cities including Paris, Milan and London. At 17, he began studying acting in New York, and by 19 had committed himself to the craft, working with preeminent acting coach William Esper. His fate was sealed while working as an extra in a club scene in the feature film _Black & White(1999)_. A talent manager visiting a client on the set spotted Somerhalder in a crowd scene of 400 and immediately signed him for representation. Happy to be anchored in New York, Somerhalder spends much of his time studying acting, writing and practicing yoga. His recreational interests include water and snow skiing and horseback riding.

 

Charles John Huffam Dickens, FRSA (pronounced /ˈtʃɑrlz ˈdɪkɪnz/; 7 February 1812–9 June 1870), pen-name “Boz”, was the most popular English novelist of the Victorian era, and one of the most popular of all time. He created some of literature’s most iconic characters, with the theme of social reform running throughout his work. The continuing popularity of his novels and short stories is such that they have never gone out of print.[1][2]

Much of his work first appeared in periodicals and magazines in serialised form, a popular way of publishing fiction at the time. Other writers would complete entire novels before serial publication commenced, but Dickens often wrote his in parts, in the order they were meant to appear. The practice lent his stories a particular rhythm, punctuated by one “cliffhanger” after another, to keep the public eager for the next installment.[3]

His work has been praised for its mastery of prose, and for its teeming gallery of unique personalities, by writers such as George Gissing and G. K. Chesterton, though the same characteristics have prompted others, such as Henry James and Virginia Woolf, to criticize him for sentimentality and implausibility.[4]

 

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (German pronunciation: [ˈjoːhan ˈvɔlfɡaŋ fɔn ˈɡøːtə]  ( listen), 28 August 1749  – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and polymath.[1] Goethe’s works span the fields of poetry, drama, literature, theology, philosophy, humanism and science. His magnum opus, lauded as one of the peaks of world literature, is the two-part drama Faust.[2] Goethe’s other well-known literary works include his numerous poems, the Bildungsroman Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship and the epistolary novel The Sorrows of Young Werther.

Goethe was one of the key figures of German literature and the movement of Weimar Classicism in the late 18th and early 19th centuries; this movement coincides with Enlightenment, Sentimentality (Empfindsamkeit), Sturm und Drang and Romanticism. The author of the scientific text Theory of Colours, his influential ideas on plant and animal morphology and homology were extended and developed by 19th century naturalists including Charles Darwin.[3][4] He also served at length as the Privy Councilor (“Geheimrat“) of the duchy of Weimar.

Goethe is the originator of the concept of Weltliteratur (“world literature“), having taken great interest in the literatures of England, France, Italy, classical Greece, Persia, the Arab world, and others. His influence on German philosophy is virtually immeasurable, having major effect especially on the generation of Hegel and Schelling, although Goethe himself expressly and decidedly refrained from practicing philosophy in the specialized sense.

Goethe’s influence spread across Europe, and for the next century his works were a major source of inspiration in music, drama, poetry and philosophy. Goethe is considered by many[who?] to be the most important writer in the German language and one of the most important thinkers in Western culture as well. Early in his career, however, he wondered whether painting might not be his true vocation; late in his life, he expressed the expectation that he would ultimately be remembered above all for his work on colour.

 

 

William Shakespeare (baptised 26 April 1564 – died 23 April 1616)[a] was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s preeminent dramatist.[1] He is often called England’s national poet and the “Bard of Avon”.[2][b] His surviving works, including some collaborations, consist of 38 plays,[c] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[3]

Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, who bore him three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, later known as the King’s Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare’s private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his physical appearance, sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others.[4]

Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613.[5][d] His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the sixteenth century. He then wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest works in the English language. In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights.

Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime. In 1623, two of his former theatrical colleagues published the First Folio, a collected edition of his dramatic works that included all but two of the plays now recognised as Shakespeare’s.

Shakespeare was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the nineteenth century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare’s genius, and the Victorians worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called “bardolatry“.[6] In the twentieth century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular today and are constantly studied, performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world.

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra[b] (Spanish pronunciation: [miˈɣel ðe θerˈβantes saˈβeðɾa] in modern Spanish; September 29, 1547 – April 23, 1616) was a Spanish novelist, poet, and playwright. His magnum opus, Don Quixote, often considered the first modern novel,[1] is a classic of Western literature and is regularly regarded among the best novels ever written. His work is considered among the most important in all of literature.[2] His influence on the Spanish language has been so great that Spanish is often called la lengua de Cervantes (The language of Cervantes).[3] He has been dubbed el Príncipe de los Ingenios – the Prince of Wits.

Cervantes was born at Alcalá de Henares, the fourth of seven children of Rodrigo de Cervantes, a surgeon born at Alcalá de Henares, and Leonor de Cortinas (native from Arganda del Rey). Cervantes’ parents were married in 1543. The family’s origins may have been of the minor gentry. Leonor died on October 19, 1593. The family moved from town to town, and little is known of Cervantes’s early years.

In 1569, Cervantes moved to Italy, where he served as a valet to Giulio Acquaviva, a wealthy priest who was elevated to cardinal the next year. By then, Cervantes had enlisted as a soldier in a Spanish Navy infantry regiment and continued his military life until 1575, when he was captured by Algerian pirates. He was ransomed from his captors by his parents and the Trinitarians. He returned to his family in Madrid.

In 1585, Cervantes published a pastoral novel, La Galatea. Because of financial problems, Cervantes worked as a purveyor for the Spanish Armada, and later as a tax collector. In 1597 discrepancies in his accounts of three years previous landed him in the Crown Jail of Seville. In 1605 he was in Valladolid, just when the immediate success of the first part of his Don Quijote, published in Madrid, signaled his return to the literary world. In 1607, he settled in Madrid, where he lived and worked until his death. During the last nine years of his life, Cervantes solidified his reputation as a writer; he published the Exemplary Novels (Novelas ejemplares) in 1613, the Journey to Parnassus in 1614, and in 1615, the Ocho comedias y ocho entremeses and the second part of Don Quixote. Carlos Fuentes noted that, “Cervantes leaves open the pages of a book where the reader knows himself to be written.”[4]

1599 and 1601. The play, set in Denmark, recounts how Prince Hamlet takes reprisal on his uncle Claudius, who has poisoned the former King Hamlet, and then taken the throne for himself and married Gertrude, Hamlet’s mother. The play vividly charts the course of real and feigned madness—from overwhelming grief to seething rage—and explores themes of treachery, revenge, incest, and moral corruption.

Despite much literary detective work, the exact year of writing remains in dispute. Three different early versions of the play have survived: these are known as the First Quarto (Q1), the Second Quarto (Q2) and the First Folio (F1). Each has lines, and even scenes, that are missing from the others. Shakespeare probably based Hamlet on the legend of Amleth, preserved by 13th-century chronicler Saxo Grammaticus in his Gesta Danorum and subsequently retold by 16th-century scholar François de Belleforest, and a supposedly lost Elizabethan play known today as the Ur-Hamlet.

Given the play’s dramatic structure and depth of characterization, Hamlet can be analyzed, interpreted and argued about from many perspectives. For example, scholars have debated for centuries about Hamlet’s hesitation in killing his uncle. Some see it as a plot device to prolong the action, and others see it as the result of pressure exerted by the complex philosophical and ethical issues that surround cold-blooded murder, calculated revenge and thwarted desire. More recently, psychoanalytic critics have examined Hamlet’s unconscious desires, and feminist critics have re-evaluated and rehabilitated the often maligned characters of Ophelia and Gertrude.

Hamlet is Shakespeare’s longest play and among the most powerful and influential tragedies in the English language. It provides a storyline capable of “seemingly endless retelling and adaptation by others”.[1] During Shakespeare’s lifetime, the play was one of his most popular works,[2] and it still ranks high among his most-performed, topping, for example, the Royal Shakespeare Company‘s list since 1879.[3] It has inspired writers from Goethe and Dickens to Joyce and Murdoch and has been described as “the world’s most filmed story after Cinderella“.[4] The title role was almost certainly created for Richard Burbage, the leading tragedian of Shakespeare’s time.[5] In the four hundred years since, it has been played by highly acclaimed actors, and sometimes actresses, of each successive age.

Walt Disney was born on 5 December 1901 and was the son of a farmer’s typical childhood. His father, Elias Disney (1859-1941), Irish ancestors, 2 had come to us from Canada and have had installed on Chicago shortly after marriage with the flora Call (1868-1938), schoolteacher in 1888. Walt was born in 1901, the fourth of five children of the matrimonio.3 in 1906 – according to some, fleeing increasing existing in Chicago-4 crime family moved to a farm in the vicinity of Marceline, Missouri. Later, Disney would say that these were the happiest years of her life. As both he and his younger sister, Ruth, were too small to help in the work of the farm, spent most of the time playing. This time date from the first contact Disney with drawing and his great fondness by trains. This idyllic period ended a few years later. In 1909, Elias Disney fell suddenly ill with typhoid, and though with the help of his older sons was unable to continue working on the farm. Sold reluctantly, and the family lived in a House leased until 1910, year in which they moved to Kansas City. For the young Disney was very hard to having to leave their rural paradise. In Kansas City, Elias began work delivering newspapers for the Kansas City Star. Walt and his brother Roy them was helping his father in the deal, hard work required to get up every day to the midnight. According to archives public school district in Kansas City, Disney began attending the Benton Grammar School in 1910, and graduated on June 8, 1911. It was not a good student: because of his work delivering newspapers, costing the concentrate and often remained asleep. It was prone to daydream and to spend time doing scribbles. Elias, left his job as a newspaper boy and became one of the owners of a company dedicated O ‘ Zell to develop carbonated beverages Company, based in Chicago. The family moved to this city, and Disney he continued his studies at Chicago’s McKinley High School. At the same time, working for his father and attended classes at the Art Institute of Chicago in the evenings. At age 15, Walt got a summer job selling newspapers and chucherías passengers from the Santa Fe railroad. Le was much more interested the train to his work, which was unsuccessful too, since often stole you goods. / / Walt Disney alongside the ambulance Red Cross driving in France. In his school years, Disney was the cartoonist of the Institute, The Village Voice newspaper. His comics were patriotic and political issue focused on the theme of World War I. In 1918, wanting to follow in the footsteps of his brother Roy, who had drafted into the Navy, left the Institute to enlist in the army. It was not accepted for being too young. Aware of the body of the Red Cross ambulances admitted boys of seventeen, Walt forged birth certificate to see was born in 1900 rather than in 1901, and had already fulfilled the seventeen. He was admitted, but never into combat. When finished his training and moved to Europe, Germany had signed the Armistice and the war had ended. He spent the rest of his time at the Red Cross as an ambulance in France, driver moving officers. Be entertained drawings filling the ambulance driving. It was also at this time when he began smoking habit accompanying him throughout his life. In 1919 requested be relieved of their military obligations and was sent back to us. Early animation determined to pursue an artistic career, moved to Kansas City. His brother Roy worked in a bank by the zone and, thanks to a friend, he got a job at Pesemen-Rubin Art Studio, where Walt